"The Seminary House" ghostly resident

Two men standing in fornt of the Seminary House

Situated in the heart of the Acadia University campus, Acadia Seminary is an architecturally impressive landmark for both the university community and the town of Wolfville.

When the residence opened in 1878, known at the time as the Acadia Ladies’ Seminary, it was a secondary school affiliated with the university to serve as residence and classrooms for female students who at the time were unable to enrol in academic classes at Acadia.

Many Seminary graduates went on to seek further education, and by 1881 women were finally permitted to enrol in classes at Acadia.

Side view of Seminary at Acadia University


According to legend, a young female student in the late 1800s discovered she was with child and hanged herself, to spare herself and her family the embarrassment of an out-of-wedlock pregnancy, taking her life in an area on the building’s second floor that’s known as “The Well,” a large opening with a banister in the second floor under the skylight.

Over the years, there have been many paranormal activities have been reported at the Seminary House. Lights turn on and off, footsteps are heard going up and down the back stairwell, doors open and close on their own, objects move by themselves, and disembodied voices can be heard throughout the residence.

Although it hasn’t been confirmed, some believe that her name was Constance Hagan, so the residents in the Seminary have given her the nickname “Connie”.

Some guests claim to have seen a young blond female wandering about the rooms and hallways, closing doors behind her, and all believe this to be the ghost of the unfortunate unwed mother-to-be. She’s been described as a polite and demure, not surprising for a young Baptist woman.

Have you experienced any paranormal activity at this location? We would love to share your story!

Here is an article, written by Ashley Tobin called “How It Feels to Live in a Haunted Residence” A story about her time spent at the Seminary House.


Sources:
studymagazine.com
historicplaces.ca

Photo credits:
archives.acadiau.ca
journals.lib.unb.ca

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